Documentary Now Available to view Online!


Recently a documentary was done about the work that Kids Hope Ethiopia and Canadian Humanitarian are doing in Africa. Originally released on Canadian Television, this documentary is now available to view online.

We hope you enjoy this documentary as much as we did!

Mobile device users please click here if the video screen does not show up below.



Canadian Humanitarian from Rick Castiglione on Vimeo.

Feel free to share this video with your friends on facebook, twitter, or wherever you like to share!

If you have any questions about the work we do, please contact Lyndon (Executive Director), or Rachel (Sponsorship Coordinator).

June Newsletter


Dan Alger and Lyndon Grunewald (Executive Director of Canadian Humanitarian and Kids Hope Ethiopia) visited the Foresight Fathers and Students in Kersa and Turge in February.   Check out a few of their favourite pictures from the trip!

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With Kids Hope Ethiopia expanding and opening new programs, we are excited to announce that our expeditions are changing!
Expedition volunteers can now travel to one, two or all three of the countries we work in: Ethiopia, Uganda, and Malawi.  For more information, or to start an application, contact Deb.

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Another exciting announcement is that this fall, a new education support center will be opening in Lira, Uganda.
Help us fill up the center! We need books, school supplies, tuition, uniformssponsorships, and food.

Donate today to stock the new education support center and give children the tools they need to reach their potential!

Highlights From This Quarter

We are having an amazing year so far with two expeditions to Ethiopia, and summertime on its way.  Check out our favourite blog posts from the past couple months:

Guest Blog Post by Shelley Van B (expedition volunteer) 
Global Youth Citizen Award 
22 Children in 22 Days 
Making a Difference 
Scholarship Update: Eyerusalem 

Come find us on facebook, twitter, and linkedin.

A visit to Kersa

In February, Dan and Lyndon went with an group of volunteers on an expedition to Ethiopia, and as part of the trip were able to spend a few days in Kersa area with the Foresight Fathers, the Students, and their families.

It was a busy few days!  Volunteers did repairs to the building, cleared part of the yard, and did medicals on enrolled Students, Foresight Fathers, Provident Mothers, and their families.

Here are a few of our favorite photos from the visit to Kersa!

February 2014 Expedition (Guest Blog Post by Shelly VanB)

The following post was written by one of our volunteers on the February Expedition, we want to be able to share these trips through their eyes and words. Thank you to Shelly for allowing us to use this post.


What Did You DO?


This trip to Ethiopia, for me was very different from other trips I’ve been involved in. We signed up as part of an Expedition which meant that we were travelling with an organization that has been working in Ethiopia for the past 10 years. The founders, Dr. Dick and Deb Northcott, have been travelling to Ethiopia over the past 21 years, since adopting two children from there.

Canadian Humanitarian (known in the US as Kids Hope Ethiopia) is an organization that I wouldn’t hesitate to send people with. The trip was well organized, their local partners were amazing and did a great job of figuring out logistics with a large team of nurses, doctors, audiologists and construction workers all in the mix. Our guys were able to have supplies ready and available for the most part, and when they needed something extra, men like Bisrat and Ketema were able to take them to the best places to find what they needed and to get them back to the worksite in a timely fashion, which is no small feat in a congested city of millions.

Our role in this expedition was to refurbish a couple of the education support centres that were falling behind in maintenance and getting run down. Stick and mud constructed buildings with 70+ children coming through on a daily basis…imagine the wear and tear. The guys did a great job patching and putting in supports for doorways, filling holes and filing down doors that no longer would close due to the shifting foundations. My role in all of this was to make sure the guys had water when they needed it and to paint when they had finished patching and pasting.

One thing about working with guys like Ken and Wayne and Dan and Dave…they never felt they had done quite enough. They worked hard from the moment they got on site and would have continued to do so had we not literally cleaned up their tools from under them and sent them back to the vans at night. There was much work to be done but they took it on and did a really great job. It’s quite something to watch skilled workers look at something that has been left undone for so long, simply because it’s beyond what someone could figure out to repair, and just get it done, not just done, but with a pride of workmanship and skill that really stood out.

The funniest part about working in Ethiopia with these guys was some of the circumstances they found themselves working in. Like painting an entire, windowless room in the pitch black by headlamp because the power was out. Or, arriving to plaster and paint at a care centre that was preparing meals and a birthday party for over 70 kids on site. We laughed at that one, who would invite kids over for a birthday party and then decide to paint the room while it was going on? And yet, we got it done with minimal painting of children…and honestly, having the laughter and shouts of children in our ears reminded us exactly who we were working for.

It’s not often on a trip that I get home and am able to pinpoint a tangible contribution but on this trip, though my skills didn’t really come into play, I do want to just leave you with some photos of the work that these guys took on. The education support centres play an important role in the work that Canadian Humanitarian does in Ethiopia. Children are able to have a safe place, where they are equals, to come and play, get support with homework, have an adult to listen to them and help them with the struggles of their often difficult lives, and to get a nutritious meal every day. The guys on this team left these places better than they found them. Safe. Bright. Clean. Welcoming.

I would be remiss if I didn’t thank again, those who donated supplies to our trip. There were several of you who just passed along a ten or a twenty dollar bill and we used that to buy paint and brushes. There were companies in our city who wish to remain anonymous, that donated all the tools for the work we did, and we left those in the hands of Canadian Humanitarian in Ethiopia for their future use. There were those Pier 1 girls, again, who just continue to be supportive and gather painting supplies or money or just write me a note to let me know they’re with me…I love that you’re with me when I go. Especially, a little friend of mine in California, who prays for me every day that I’m gone or as I’m preparing to leave…Sienna ~ you are changing lives already. You are such a great prayer buddy and I’m so thankful to know that when I’m travelling far from home, you’re thinking of me and praying for me. It means so much! You’re the best. Enjoy the photos….you’re all in every one.

Drip Irrigation Team

To help family gardens and the market garden in Gindo, this group brought materials to construct this simple irrigation system. During the dry season, rivers and creeks dry up.  Wells become the source of water for gardens and fields meaning children and women haul water for this as well as their personal needs.
Drip irrigation slowly waters individual plants all day long from a water source. Gravity feeds the water through the hoses to individual plants. The barrel holding the water needs only be filled once a day, and then waters each plant during the day.
  The farmers, gardeners, and families who received these systems were thrilled with the prospect of reduced time, effort and water needed to help their gardens produce!

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The Medical Team

October’s group had 5 doctors, 2 nurses, and 1 pharmacist in our midst. We completed medicals on the children at Gindo, on children of the Kirkos center, on children at the Kality Center, and on some of the children who needed follow up at the Guelele center.

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We again went to the Kersa area, to do intake medicals on the youth and children in this new program, as well as medicals for the Foresight Fathers and their families.

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Over all we managed to complete 386 medical examinations, many of which required prescribed medicines!  Sometimes our surroundings were quite simple or primitive, but the care received was very appreciated!

The Tanners come to visit

Ron and Martha Tanner, who have volunteered on a long term basis at our Education Support Centers in the past, now live in Ethiopia, only 30 minutes away from where we were today in Sheshamene.
So they came and joined us for a time. It was great to see them!
Ron- as usual kept the crowds begging for more of his magic tricks. They absolutely love seeing him making a hankie disappear!

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Traditional Cooking

While the team was building and installing the bio-sand filtration systems, the foresight father’s wives set up fires, and cooked fresh picked potatoes- to boil and serve as a treat for everyone. They used both a modern and traditional pots to cook these in!

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With some spices and salt, these were wonderful to taste!

Installing the Bio Sand Filtration Systems

The Men and their wives were pretty excited to see the Bio Sand Filtration Units come together. I think they finally started to understand how the filter would purify their water as it ran through these buckets.

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Today two of these units were installed to two homes. This first home was a 22 year old man, one of the Foresight Fathers, who has 5 children and two wives (yes polygamy is still practiced in this part of Ethiopia)

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This home was on a quiet street in the village with lots of trees, their own backyard garden, stock holding pen and everything!

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The Medical Clinic

We have spent the last two days doing medical, English skill building, art, and bio sand filters in Turge and Kersa Ayele.

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This has been Dr. Northcott’s medical clinic. it has two rooms, shade, and walls that are wooden slats so the breeze can blow through. Since it has been about 28 C each day and a bit humid.. this has been the best place to be to work!

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A Special Treat

This specially decorated pot held on top (the caramel looking mound) a special treat for us! It is a local specialty made from butter and barley flour. This has the texture of fudge, but tasted like having a spoon full of peanut butter (but no peanuts!)
What a great celebration!

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A Warm Welcome

We all gathered at one of the father’s homes close by for their welcoming ceremony to us. We will be working with them for the next 3 days.

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This woman welcomed us to her home and fed us hot boiled potatoes with spices (peeled boiled potatoes prepared like this taste like candy – delicious!)

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Visiting the Foresight Fathers Compound

We visited the Foresight Fathers compound in Kersa; to say hello to the program managers, and to see their new education center.

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Adults were receiving a training session under the warka tree.

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The youth group was busy making seedling plantings of coffee bushes… they hope to raise a crop of coffee this year and earn about $40,000 Birr profit in 2014 from their efforts.

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